Top Books for Seven Year Olds in 2019

101 Books for Seven Year Olds with Hungry Imaginations

The absolute best books to get seven year olds hooked on reading.

Moving through grade school, children are able to tackle longer and more complex stories. Between picture books, chapter books, novellas, and even novels, the books for seven year olds bridge the gap between knowledge and imagination.

Here are the top books for seven year olds based on reviews and personal bias.

1. The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs

You thought you knew the story of the “The Three Little Pigs”. You thought wrong. In this hysterical and clever fracture fairy tale picture book that twists point of view and perspective, readers will finally hear the other side of the story of “The Three Little Pigs.”

Why it makes my list for seven year olds: This is perhaps the most worn non-Seuss, non-Dahl kids’ book on my bookshelf. It’s the original “fairy tale flip”, long before the likes of Wicked and Nightmare Before Christmas existed.

“Smith’s simplistic and wacky illustrations add to the effectiveness of this fractured fairy tale.” Children’s Literature.

2. Rosie Revere, Engineer

Rosie Revere dreamed of becoming a great engineer. Where some people see rubbish, Rosie sees inspiration. Alone in her room at night, shy Rosie constructs great inventions from odds and ends. Hot dog dispensers, helium pants, python-repelling cheese hats: Rosie’s gizmos would astound—if she ever let anyone see them.

Why it makes my list for seven year olds: I’m a sucker for rhyming stories, and Beaty pulls off Rosie with great flair and humor. Amazing message, beautiful art. The perfect package.

“I have 7 children 6 grandchildren. I’ve taught preschool, been a nanny. This book is a must have book in all children’s libraries.” (Robyn, Amazon)

3. Pippi Longstocking

Tommy and his sister Annika have a new neighbor: Pippi Longstocking. She has crazy red pigtails, no parents to tell her what to do, a horse that lives on her porch, and a flair for the outrageous that seems to lead to one adventure after another.

Why it makes my list for seven year olds: Pippi equals girl power. Plus, if you want your children to understand your old-school references, it’s a good idea to share this one.

“Anyone who has a passion for words and wordplay will enjoy reading The Phantom Tollbooth.” Shivani, Goodreads.

4. The Phantom Tollbooth

For Milo, everything’s a bore until a tollbooth appears in his room. On the other side, things seem different. Milo visits the Island of Conclusions (you get there by jumping), learns about time from a ticking watchdog, and embarks on a quest to rescue Rhyme and Reason. Somewhere along the way, he realizes something astonishing: life is far from dull.

Why it makes my list for seven year olds: Finding fun and excitement in the mundane is exactly what most kids need. Tollbooth is a classic jumpstarter for imaginations.

“My son hates reading, so I was trying hard to find something that gets his attention. Pippi helped a lot.” Vancouver Mom on Amazon

5. The Trouble with Chickens

J.J. Tully is a former search-and-rescue dog who is trying to enjoy his retirement after years of performing daring missions saving lives, so he’s not terribly impressed when a chicken shows up demanding help to track down a missing chick. Driven by the promise of a cheeseburger, J.J. begins chasing clues. Are dark forces at work, or is J.J. not smelling the evidence that’s right in front of him?

Why it makes my list for seven year olds: As a fan of mysteries and crime flicks on Netflix, I wish I’d had this light-hearted introduction to the genre as a youngster.

“I couldn’t help but smile several times throughout the book. Well written, fun book for kids.” (Montzalee, Goodreads)

6. Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

Alexander knew it was going to be a terrible day when he woke up with gum in this hair. And it got worse. His best friend deserted him. There was no dessert in his lunch bag. And, on top of all that, there were lima beans for dinner and kissing on TV.

Why it makes my list for six year olds: It’s good to know that while things are going badly, they’ll always pick back up again!

“I have to admit that there’s nothing quite like reading a book to a kid that you both love in equal measure.” (Bradley, Goodreads)

7. Turning Pages: My Life Story

As the first Latina Supreme Court Justice, Sonia Sotomayor has inspired young people around the world to reach for their dreams. In Turning Pages, Justice Sotomayor shares her love of books with a new generation of readers and inspires them to read and puzzle and dream for themselves.

Why it makes my list for seven year olds: We could all learn a lot from Supreme Court justices, including kids. Hard work, diversity, and family are the common threads that weave this book together, regardless of your political viewpoint.

“A thoughtful introduction to both the power of reading and an inspiring role model.” (Kirkus Reviews)

8. Sideways Stories from Wayside School

Accidentally built sideways and standing thirty stories high (the builder said he was very sorry for the mistake), Wayside School has some of the wackiest classes in town. That’s where you’ll meet Bebe, the fastest draw in art class; John, who only reads upside down; Myron, the best class president ever; and Sammy, the new kid—he’s a real rat.

Why it makes my list for seven year olds: It’s pure fun and nonsense. Dark at times (but never too dark), it’s a great romp with a great sense of humor.

“Sachar is the reigning king of oddball humor. These linked stories are both bizarre and sublime.” (Brightly)

9. How the Grinch Stole Christmas!

“Every Who down in Who-ville liked Christmas a lot…but the Grinch, who lived just north of Who-ville, did NOT!” Not since “’Twas the night before Christmas” has the beginning of a Christmas tale been so instantly recognizable. This heartwarming story about the effects of the Christmas spirit will grow even the coldest and smallest of hearts. Like mistletoe, candy canes, and caroling, the Grinch is a mainstay of the holidays, and his story is the perfect gift for young and old.

Why it makes my list for seven year olds: I recommend pretty much every Seuss books for seven-year-olds, but this one takes the roast beast. As someone who specializes in holiday literature, The Grinch is the gold standard. Bar none.

“Obviously How the Grinch Stole Christmas! is a 5 star rating. I mean, come on, it deserves NOTHING less.” (Christina, Goodreads)

10. The Adventures of Captain Underpants

Fourth graders George Beard and Harold Hutchins are a couple of class clowns. The only thing they enjoy more than playing practical jokes is creating their own comic books. And together they’ve created the greatest superhero in the history of their elementary school: Captain Underpants!

Why it makes my list for seven year olds: My friends were huge Captain Underpants fans in elementary school. This one’s for them.

“So appealing that youngsters won’t notice that their vocabulary is stretching.” (School Library Journal)

11. Dory Fantasmagory

As the youngest in her family, Dory wants attention. More than anything she wants her brother and sister to play with her. But she’s too much of a baby for them, so she’s left to her own devices—including her wild imagination and untiring energy. When they really need her, daring Dory will prove her bravery and finally get exactly what she has been looking for.

Why it makes my list for seven year olds: The story and illustrations are equally funny, filled with dry wit and charm that you don’t often find in younger kids’ books.

“Perfection of tone, plot, pacing, art, you name it.” (Betsy Bird, A Fuse #8 Production)

12. Geronimo Stilton and the Kingdom of Fantasy

Geronimo knew from the start that it was no ordinary day, but he certainly didn’t expect to find a golden staircase in his attic. Up at the top, there was a door. And beyond the door was a world he never could have imagined—the Kingdom of Fantasy! Along with his guide, a frog named Scribblehopper, he set off on an incredible adventure to save the Queen of the Fairies.

Why it makes my list for seven year olds: Although I’m new to the series, Geronimo Stilton has been writing about his rodent adventures for years. Fans enjoy the explosive fonts that pop off the page and the unique characters that make these stories feel as much like video games as they do books.

“My 7 year old son loves this book. He finished it in 2 days. He rereading it again and again.” (K. Chan, Amazon)

13. Sam and Dave Dig a Hole

Sam and Dave are on a mission. A mission to find something spectacular. So they dig a hole. And they keep digging. And they find…nothing. Yet the day turns out to be pretty spectacular after all. Attentive readers will be rewarded with a rare treasure in this witty story of looking for the extraordinary — and finding it in a manner you’d never expect.

Why it makes my list for seven year olds: As a kid, I was obsessed with buried treasure and hiding things in the garden (I still am). If you or your kids are similar, this book is for you. Plus, look at that art. Just look at it. Beautiful.

“The prose is deadpan; the joke’s all in Klassen’s winsomely smudgy illustrations.” (New York Times Book Review)

14. Where the Sidewalk Ends

Meet a boy who turns into a TV set and a girl who eats a whale. The Unicorn and the Bloath live there, and so does Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout who will not take the garbage out. This is a place where you wash your shadow and plant diamond gardens, a place where shoes fly, sisters are auctioned off, and crocodiles go to the dentist.

Why it makes my list for seven year olds: Where the Sidewalk Ends is as fun and impressionable as reading gets. I can still recite Sarah Sylvia Cynthia Stout by memory.

“These rhymes are perfect bite-sized nuggets of jest.” (Brightly)

15. The Frog and Toad Collection

From sledding in winter to eating ice cream on hot summer days, Frog and Toad know how to have fun together the whole year round. This particular collection includes the complete art and text from three classics in a paperback slipcase: Frog and Toad Are Friends, Frog and Toad Together, and Frog and Toad All Year.

Why it makes my list for seven year olds: This iconic duo is great for a wide range of ages—particularly kids who can read on their own but might need extra help once in a while.

“My children loved Frog and Toad books, and thirty years later we still quote funny lines from these characters.” (Janice, Amazon)

16. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Willy Wonka’s famous chocolate factory is opening at last! But only five lucky children will be allowed inside: Augustus Gloop, an enormous boy whose hobby is eating; Veruca Salt, a spoiled brat whose parents are wrapped around her finger; Violet Beauregarde, a dim-witted gum-chewer; Mike Teavee, a kid obsessed with television; and Charlie Bucket, our hero, a boy who’s ready for the wildest time of his life.

Why it makes my list for seven year olds: I remember my teacher reading Charlie to our second-grade class to this day. Few authors can hold a candle to Dahl.

“Rich in humor, acutely observant, Dahl lets his imagination rip in fairyland.” (New York Times Book Review)

17. The Toymaker

When a greedy toymaker stumbles across one of Santa’s elves on Christmas Eve, he holds the elf hostage in a sinister attempt to overthrow the North Pole. Can Christmastown withstand the attack or will it take a holiday miracle to stop the villain from going too far?

Why it makes my list for seven year olds: The Toymaker is neither the scariest book nor the least scary book in the D. Melhoff collection, making it a good choice for kids who want to dip their toes into something slightly more thrilling.

“The Toymaker. It is twisted. It is fun. It is weird. It is holiday. It is awesome.” (Brian Baumgartner, The Office)


Top Books for Six Year Olds in 2019

101 Books for Six Year Olds With Sparky Imaginations

The absolute best books to get six year olds hooked on reading.

A whole new world opens up as children learn how to read. There is no skill more important than developing literacy—reading helps creativity, imagination, and language flourish. Books open new doors as reality takes a backseat.

Here are the top books for six year olds based on reviews and personal bias.

1. The Rainbow Fish

The Rainbow Fish is an international bestseller and modern classic. Eye-catching foilstamping may offer instant child-appeal, but it is the universal message at the heart of this simple story about a beautiful fish who learns to make friends by sharing his most prized possessions that gives the book its lasting value.

Why it makes my list for six year olds: The unique foilstamping illustrations are eye-catching and fun. It’s beautiful and packed with nostalgia.

“I heard this book read aloud for the first time at summer camp. It is a beautiful story about the joy that comes from giving yourself to others.” Karen, Goodreads.

2. The Day the Crayons Quit

Duncan just wants to color, but when he opens his box of crayons, he finds only letters saying the same thing: We quit! Beige is tired of playing second fiddle to Brown. Blue needs a break from coloring water, while Pink just wants to be used. Green has no complaints, but Orange and Yellow are no longer speaking. What’s Duncan to do?

Why it makes my list for six year olds: You’ll never look at orange the same way again.

“I bought two copies for my godchildren, but I should have bought another one just for me. It’s that fun.” Amber, Goodreads.

3. The Easter Witch

After an unlucky witch accidentally eats the Easter Bunny, she must deliver the world’s chocolates, treats, and presents before it’s too late. Can Easter be saved with the help of some Halloween magic, or will the witch’s spells backfire and ruin the holiday?

  • Author: D. Melhoff
  • Goodreads Rating: 4.85
  • Buy on: Amazon

Why it makes my list for six year olds: Combining Easter and Halloween is a 2-for-1 deal. You get the best parts of both holidays with a dose of dark humor and fun.

“This is such a clever book!!! It combines Halloween and Easter with such flair.” Tea Mayo, Amazon

4. James and the Giant Peach

When James drops some magic crystals by the old peach tree, strange things start to happen. The peach at the top of the tree begins to grow, and before long it’s as big as a house. With a snip of the stem, the peach household starts rolling away—and the adventure begins.

  • Author: Roald Dahl
  • Goodreads Rating: 4
  • Buy on: Amazon

Why it makes my list for six year olds: Every child should experience the whimsical ways of Roald Dahl. There are other Dahl books in the top 101, but there’s something about James that puts it near the top.

“Dahl transports us to wonderful worlds of adventure and peculiarity with characters every child would love to meet.” (Lou, Goodreads)

5. The Lorax

Long before saving the earth became a global concern, Dr. Seuss warned against mindless progress and the danger it posed to the earth’s natural beauty. Like Dahl, many Seuss books made the top 101 list, but The Lorax is rated among the highest.

  • Author: Dr. Seuss
  • Goodreads Rating: 4.34
  • Buy on: Amazon

Why it makes my list for six year olds: The Lorax is more important today than ever, and despite its grim message it gets its point across in fun Seussian fashion.

“The Lorax is not just a children’s book but so much more! Every family should have this as a staple in their home.” (Gilda, Amazon)

6. This is Not My Hat

When a tiny fish shoots into view wearing a round blue topper (which happens to fit him perfectly), trouble could be close behind. Visual humor swims to the fore as the best-selling Jon Klassen follows his breakout debut with another deadpan-funny tale.

  • Author: Jon Klassen
  • Goodreads Rating: 4.25
  • Buy on: Amazon

Why it makes my list for six year olds: A fish in a hat? Fantastic. This book pairs words with unique illustrations to make a stunning impression.

The humorous visuals were perfectly placed. This is my favorite of Jon Klassen’s hat books. (Laura, Goodreads)

7. The Dark

Laszlo is afraid of the dark. The dark is not afraid of Laszlo. Laszlo lives in a house. The dark lives in the basement. One night, the dark comes upstairs to Laszlo’s room, and Laszlo goes down to the basement…

  • Author: Lemony Snicket
  • Goodreads Rating: 4.09
  • Buy on: Amazon

Why it makes my list for six year olds: I was terrified of the dark as a child (sometimes still am), but this book makes it bearable. Also, Snicket and Klassen are a deadly combo.

“Lemony Snicket and Jon Klassen were put on this Earth to make books together. Pure magic!” (Laura, Goodreads)

8. The Most Magnificent Thing

A girl decides she is going to make the most MAGNIFICENT thing! She knows just how it will look. She knows just how it will work. All she has to do is make it, and she makes things all the time. The only problem? Making a magnificent thing is anything but easy.

  • Author: Ashley Spires
  • Goodreads Rating: 4.31
  • Buy on: Amazon

Why it makes my list for six year olds: Both kids and adults can learn a thing or two about anger management from this book. Plus, the message is fantastic.

“What an amazing book with a beautiful, truly insightful message for young children!” (Marie, Goodreads)

9. The Book With No Pictures

A book with no pictures? What kind of book is this? Simple and ingeniously imaginative, The Book With No Pictures inspires laughter every time it’s opened, creating a warm and joyous experience and introducing children to the powerful idea that the written word can be an unending source of mischief and delight.

  • Author: B.J. Novak
  • Goodreads Rating: 4.36
  • Buy on: Amazon

Why it makes my list for six year olds: Both kids and adults can learn a thing or two about anger management from this book. Plus, the message is fantastic.

“I did not think I would enjoy “The Book With No Pictures”, but it ended up being one of my favorite children’s books.” (Morris, Goodreads)

10. The Creatrilogy

The Creatrilogy is a collection of books that celebrate the power of original thinking. These stories include The Dot, Ish, and Sky Color—all three recommended for six year olds. You can get them bundled together or individually.

  • Author: Peter H. Reynolds
  • Goodreads Rating: 4.85
  • Buy on: Amazon

Why it makes my list for six year olds: As a writer, I’m particularly drawn to stories about encouraging creativity. Ish does that in droves.

“It’s hard to find books that my son likes, I like, AND can be used in a classroom. This fits all the criteria!” (Sala, Amazon)

11. The Fate of Fausto

Coming September 2019, The Fate of Fausto is a quirky, cautionary tale from beloved New York Times bestselling picture book creator Oliver Jeffers. Fausto is a man who believes he owns everything and sets out to survey what is his.

  • Author: Oliver Jeffers
  • Goodreads Rating: 4.58
  • Preorder on: Amazon

Why it makes my list for six year olds: Combining powerful prose with traditional lithographic printmaking for the first time, world-renowned Oliver Jeffers has surely created a poignant modern-day fable to touch the hearts of adults and children alike.  It’s the only book on the list that’s not out yet—make sure to preorder it.

“Boldly conceived and gracefully executed.” (Publishers Weekly)

12. Where the Wild Things Are

One night Max puts on his wolf suit and makes mischief of one kind and another, so his mother calls him ‘Wild Thing’ and sends him to bed without supper. That night a forest grows in Max’s room and an ocean rushes by with a boat to take Max to where the Wild Things are…

  • Author: Maurice Sendak
  • Goodreads Rating: 4.22
  • Buy on: Amazon

Why it makes my list for six year olds: You can’t make a list of books for six year olds without Where the Wild Things Are. Period.

“A timeless classic that continues to win over the hearts of children. The rhythmic text and expressive illustrations are just as appealing today as they were when I was a child.” (Brightly)

13. Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs

If food dropped like rain from the sky, wouldn’t it be marvelous! Or would it? It could, after all, be messy. And you’d have no choice. What if you didn’t like what fell? Or what if too much came? Have you ever thought of what it might be like to be squashed flat by a pancake? Skip the movie and find out in the original tale.

  • Author: Judi Barrett
  • Goodreads Rating: 4.16
  • Buy on: Amazon

Why it makes my list for six year olds: Cloudy is one of the books I remember vividly from first grade. Food in kids’ books is irresistible, and this one’s packed with it.

“This was my absolute favorite book as a child. The story line is unique & original does not “talk down” to a child’s level.” (A Modern Classic)

14. If You Give a Mouse a Cookie

If a hungry mouse shows up on your doorstep, you might want to give him a cookie. And if you give him a cookie, he’ll ask for a glass of milk. He’ll want to look in a mirror to make sure he doesn’t have a milk mustache, and then he’ll ask for a pair of scissors to give himself a trim. This book is a great first introduction to Mouse, the star of the If You Give… series and a perennial favorite among kids

  • Author: Laura Joffe Numeroff
  • Goodreads Rating: 4.25
  • Buy on: Amazon

Why it makes my list for six year olds: I still find myself muttering “If you give a mouse a cookie…” around people who are never satisfied. Clearly the book makes a strong impression and has been a staple with youngsters for a long time.

“This was my absolute favorite book as a child. The story line is unique & original does not “talk down” to a child’s level.” (A Modern Classic)

15. Here We Are: Notes for Living on Planet Earth

Our world can be a bewildering place, especially if you’ve only just got here. Your head will be filled with questions, and Here We Are explores what makes our planet tick and how we live on it. From land and sky, to people and time, these notes will be your guide.

  • Author: Oliver Jeffers
  • Goodreads Rating: 4.52
  • Buy on: Amazon

Why it makes my list for six year olds: The second book on this list by Jeffers, it’s clear he knows how to tap into what children want and deliver it with informative entertainment.

“[Jeffers] is the master of capturing the joy in our differences.” (New York Times Book Review)

16. The Monster at the End of This Book

Generations of kids have interacted with lovable, furry old Grover as he begs the reader not to turn the page—for fear of a monster at the end of the book. “Oh, I am so embarrassed,” he says on the last page . . . for, of course, the monster is Grover himself!

  • Author: Jon Stone
  • Goodreads Rating: 4.44
  • Buy on: Amazon

Why it makes my list for six year olds: Many adults say this book is their all-time favorite—and for good reason. It’s a quick, colorful romp with a classic character.

“I think all parents should be required to read this book to their kids. It’s such a cute story.” (Jen, Amazon)

Get the 101 Books for Six-Year-Olds Checklist!

We couldn’t fit all 101 books for six year olds on one page, so we created a spreadsheet. Grab it now and start checking them off!

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Who Really Wrote the Poem "Come Little Children"?

Who Really Wrote Come Little Children?

UPDATE: This post was updated on 11/12/16 with new info. See additions at end.


When I started writing my novel, Come Little Children, I wasn't sure who had composed the poem with the same title. Turns out, it's a little complicated.

Like most moviegoers, I first heard about the poem in Disney’s 1993 film HOCUS POCUS when a much younger, much blonder Sarah Jessica Parker sung the lines while riding a broomstick and flaunting her—what do you call them, Max?—yabbos for the town of Salem. When you Google the lyrics, however, you find versions with extended verses that were never in the final cut of the movie.

Originally, Sarah sang:

Come little children, I’ll take the away
into a land of Enchantment.
Come little children, the time’s come to play
here in my garden of magic.

But the version that’s floating around the internet has two extra verses:

Come little children, I'll take thee away
into a land of Enchantment,
Come little children, the time's come to play
here in my garden of Shadows.

Follow sweet children, I'll show thee the way
through all the pain and the Sorrows.
Weep not poor children, for life is this way
Murdering beauty and Passions.

Hush now dear children, it must be this way
to weary of life and Deceptions,
Rest now my children, for soon we'll away
into the calm and the Quiet.

Come little children, I'll take thee away
into a land of Enchantment,
Come little children, the time's come to play
here in my garden of Shadows.

Aside from some capitalization and formatting differences, the most noticeable change is the last word of the first verse: "magic" becomes "shadows".

So what's the original version? Where did it come from? Was it written for Disney, or is it based on older material that’s now in the public domain?

Well, like I said, it’s kinda complicated…

A lot of people claim the poem is by Edgar Allan Poe, including this site and this site. However, Poe-enthusiasts think that’s ludicrous because it doesn’t show up in his omnibus and it doesn’t fit his style.

Other people argue that Brock Walsh is the author, whose IMDB credits from HOCUS POCUS include "Chants and Incantations", as well as lyrics for "Sarah's Theme" and "Come Little Children". Sounds promising, right? Unfortunately, back when I was researching this topic, “promising” wasn't good enough. I wanted to publish the poem in my novel, and I wasn’t keen on being sued. [To be clear: asking for forgiveness rather than permission is fine when it comes to buying a pet or pranking someone on April Fools' Day, but it falls apart quickly when you’re served cease and desist papers from The Big Mouse.]

So I contacted Brock Walsh.

Anecdote: I actually contacted John Debney first, because he’s the one credited for the music of HOCUS POCUS. Alas, I was informed that he didn’t come onto the project until after “Sarah’s Theme” had been written. The original composer was James Horner, but when I tried contacting him, his agent said that since Debney was the one who got the final music credit, it was best if I talked to the studio attached to the film (Disney). In other words: "Sorry, but Mr. Horner is too busy composing his next Oscar-winning score to answer a question about a tune he may or may not have written for a couple of witches in 1993."

Anyhow, I asked Mr. Walsh if he was the original poet or if the internet was right and Poe was the author. His response was the following:

Dear Mr. Melhoff,

That has to be the most gratifying, and apocryphal, bit of internet misinformation ever! Being confused with Poe? Must have been my obsession with him as a child. Yes, the lyric is my creation, written in tandem with James Horner.

As to extended verses, if you can provide, I'll vouch for their veracity.

Best Regards,

Brock Walsh

Finally I was getting somewhere! Unfortunately—and this is where the rabbit hole gets deeper and more mysterious—when I gave Brock the extended verses, he told me that he was not the author of them.

Right. Now what.

Both of us did some digging and discovered an artist by the name of Kate Covington who had a YouTube channel called Erutan Music. She had covered the song (fantastically, I might add) and took credit as the person who changed the word “magic” to “shadows”.

Sadly, that’s where the case goes cold. Neither Kate nor Brock know where the other two verses came from, so I handed it over to a licensing company and let them take it from there. Months later, they got back to me and told me to credit it as follows:

Garden Of Magic
from HOCUS POCUS*
Text based on the poem "Come Little Children" by Edgar Allan Poe
Additional text by Brock Walsh
Music by James Horner
(c) 1993 Walt Disney Music Company
All Rights Reserved Used by Permission
*Adapted lyrics not used in film
Reprinted by Permission of Hal Leonard Corporation

If you’ve followed the whole story thus far, you’re probably as surprised as I was. I doubt the licensing company tried very hard to track down the true source, but at least it seems like I've got the permission to print based on the original Disney lyrics.

If you know more about the mystery verses, please leave a comment or email me and I’ll gladly update this article. Cliffhangers can be great in movies but they blow in real life.

UPDATE: November 12, 2016

There might be a light at the end of the tunnel, folks! Thanks to some clever digging from someone who found this blog post, it appears that a person who goes by the name Belos takes credit for the extra verses on their site. That website is no longer live, but thanks to the Wayback Machine (an internet archive of web pages), you can see their claim here.

In the event that the archive disappears one day, here's a screenshot of it:

come-little-children-source

Callid, the person who messaged me about this find, has another interesting theory too:

"Thanks to the Internet Archive, we know Belos published those lines in December 2002 or earlier. As you can see, the page is entitled 'Poe3', which is probably why some people assumed it displayed Poe's work, but seems to be simply short for 'poetry'. Apparently, these misattributions were common even early on, as Belos published an addendum in early 2006 , clarifying that he is the author of the middle stanzas (in his counting, stanzas 3 to 6), and that he also made the change from 'magic' to 'shadows'."

Belos' claim that he/she was the one to change "magic" to "shadows" conflicts with Kate's claim, but nevertheless, Belos is the first person I've seen to take credit for the middle verses.

Thank you to everyone who has contacted me about this topic, particularly Callid. I had no idea it would be such a wild goose chase. If you find any more information, don't hesitate to email me. I'm clearly obsessed with this topic.

D.


D. Melhoff releases two twisted kids’ books in time for Halloween and Thanksgiving

In a brief departure from full-length novels, I'm releasing not one but two kids' books at the beginning of October. 

 

These books mark the first pair in a series of four holiday tales aimed at young readers. Deliciously dark and beautifully illustrated by my irreplaceable partner-in-crime, Arianne Elsammak, the subject material is fun and accessible for anyone who wants a bit of mischief and humor with their holiday reading. 

 

I always liked gruesome kids' stories growing up, particularly Roald Dahl's The Witches, Revolting Rhymes, The Twits, etc. So it's no surprise that instead of puppies and kittens, I wrote about killer turkeys and haunted houses.

Enjoy.


Give the Gift of Horror this Xmas

Why restrict your love for horror to Halloween when there are so many other holidays in need of terror? Here are the top five reasons to get your friends/loved ones/Secret Santas a frightening novel this Xmas season.

  1. Books provide more hours of entertainment than 95% of gifts

    Of course, if you were thinking of putting a speedboat or a motor home under the tree, knock yourself out.

  1. Gift getters won’t have to put up with bad acting

    Most horror movies (especially the classics) are too cheesy to take seriously. If someone wants a really good scare, it’s better to let him or her imagine it themselves.

  1. Horror saves lives

    Do you have a gut feeling one of your friends would NOT do well in a zombie apocalypse? There’s no harm preparing them with a few cautionary tales in case the unthinkable occurs.

  1. Help someone burn calories and stay fit

    Who needs a Bowflex® or an AbMaster when horror is apparently proven to boost energy levels and give you a better grip on reality?

  1. Swap it for cash

    If no one at your gift exchange wants the book you brought, you can accept bribes to exchange it for your own prize plus a little extra to sweeten the deal. Earning money AND a good book? Double win.

Convinced? Perfect, and lucky for you—and your Christmas budget—Come Little Children is now available for $2.99 (ebook) or $9.99 (paperback) from Amazon through to the end of December.

Have a horrifying Christmas, everyone, and an alarming New Year.